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Reviewer #2 speaks out after being "canceled" on Twitter

1 min read

reviewer #2

Wishing to remain anonymous, the tenured professor commonly known as "Reviewer #2" penned an open letter Friday aimed squarely at that 3rd-year grad student who finally got the courage to submit a first-author paper.

"I really enjoyed your approach. I just can't believe you didn't cite my previous work that obviously inspired it." he said, while sipping port wine in his candle-lit study.

After more ambiguous ranting that we struggled to pull meaning from, he continued:

"I don't even have a Twitter account, but that didn't stop you and your mob from publicly chastising me for suggesting major revisions including using a different color scheme on your trend lines."

When we contacted Reviewer #2 to comment on this unfair treatment, he added:

"Reviewer #1 has a history of being too soft and I worry about upholding the rigorous standards of science that consistently abused me when I was in training."

"And we all know Reviewer #3 just wants to leave early to catch happy hour at the corner bar. So I'm forced to be the bad guy again and again."

 


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